Amazing Health Benefits of Eating Cashew Nuts

 FABULOUS HEALTH BENEFITS CASHEW NUTS

Cashew nuts also have a fatty acid profile that contributes to good health through phytosterols, tocopherols, and sqaulene, all of which lower the risk of heart disease, combined with the nut’s zero percent cholesterol content.



Even with the relatively high fat content, cashew nuts are considered to be a “low-fat” nut. In fact, cashew nuts contain less fat per serving than many other popular nuts commonly found in grocery stores and health food stores, including almonds, walnuts, peanuts and pecans.

Cashew nuts do have a relatively high fat content (12 grams per ounce, 2 grams saturated fat), but it is considered “good fat.” This is due to the agreeable fat ratio in the nut, 1:2:1 for saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated, respectively, which scientists say is the ideal ratio for optimal health.

Medical Benefits

The cashew tree’s leaves and bark as well as the popular cashew apple possess

herbal health benefits that include killing bacteria and germs, stopping diarrhoea,

drying secretions, increasing the libido, and reducing fever, blood sugar, blood

pressure and body temperature, but unfortunately the by-products of these parts of

the cashew tree are not available in North America and Europe, mainly due to their

highly perishable qualities.

The cashew nut, a popular treat found on grocery and health food store shelves

across the world, is jam-packed with nutritional content. It packs 5 grams of

protein per ounce and high levels of the essential minerals iron, magnesium,

phosphorus, zinc, copper and manganese, which are utilized in holistic health

solutions and healthy diets.

Diet and Weight Management

Cashew nuts do have a relatively high fat content (12 grams per ounce, 2 grams

saturated fat), but it is considered “good fat.” This is due to the agreeable fat ratio

in the nut, 1:2:1 for saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated, respectively,

which scientists say is the ideal ratio for optimal health.

Gallstones

All nuts, including the cashew nut, have been associated with a reduced risk of

gallstone disease.

According to the Nurses’ Health Study, looking at the dietary data of 80,718

women, integrating at least one ounce of nuts a week, such as cashews, gives

women a 25 percent lower risk of developing gallstones.

Dental Health

Research has also shown that chemicals in cashew nuts kill gram positive bacteria,

a pervasive mouth affliction that causes tooth decay, acne, tuberculosis and

leprosy.

Eating cashew nuts at moderate levels, some say, can eliminate abscessed teeth,

though this has not been proven yet by proper clinical trials.

Topical Uses

While the cashew nut is most enjoyed when eaten, it also possesses astringent

qualities that are now used in topical creams and gels.

A Philippine scientist who has made a career out of studying the health benefits of

cashew nut extract markets the extract in a cream for warts, moles and other skin

growths.

The Philippine-produced cream is also reportedly effective on basal cell

carcinoma, the most common type of skin cancer, though this too is not yet

available in the U.S.